Seeking an End of Epidemics: Advancing the Global Health Security Agenda

March 30, 2016 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Garrett Hall (The Batten School)


Stopping outbreaks at the source can save thousands of lives, prevent political collapse, and deter billions in economic losses. Preventing, detecting, and rapidly responding to biological threats – whether naturally occurring like Ebola, Zika, MERS, and influenza, or deliberate like the 2001 anthrax attacks – is a national security priority, as well as a global health imperative. Unfortunately, despite over a decade of implementation, only approximately 30% of all countries have in place the essential capacity required by the International Health Regulations (2005) to address infectious disease threats. 

This talk will explore the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) as a multilateral, Leaders level initiative to establish targets, accelerate measurable commitment, and sustain global interest and financing across sectors. The United States has made a commitment to assist at least 31 countries to achieve the Agenda’s targets, the G-7 has made a collective commitment to assist at least 76 countries, and the 50-country multilateral GHSA collective has made over 100 new commitments to accelerate national, regional and global progress. Synchronizing these commitments to achieve sustainable capacity will require a new frame for country collaboration across sectors, budgets and borders.

Elizabeth (Beth) Cameron is the Director for Countering Biological Threats with the National Security Council staff, where she played a major role in conceiving and launching the Global Health Security Agenda and oversees issues relating to countering biological threats, including biosecurity, dual-use research of concern, combating bioterrorism, biological select agents and toxins, and epidemic threats such as Ebola. 
Prior to this assignment, she served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense as Senior Advisor and in the role of Chief of Staff for Honorable Andrew Weber, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Defense Programs (NCB). 

Beth holds a Ph.D. in Biology from the Human Genetics and Molecular Biology Program at the Johns Hopkins University and a BA in Biology from the University of Virginia.

Co-sponsored by Batten Global and the Center for Global Health